Baby Food Boom

The case for a mostly-mushy new diet

A formerly familiar food is taking campus by storm. No, it’s not Spaghetti-O’s (those are always in style, geez), it’s baby food. With a rainbow of flavors and a chew-free guarantee, it was only a matter of time before the overworked college students of the University of Minnesota decided to give Gerber’s another shot—feeding each other airplane style, of course.

Madison Digiovanni - Baby Food Review

Illustrator: Madison Digiovanni

To the unrefined, first-timer’s tongue, traditional baby food has a distinctly slimy feel, but three spoonfuls in, it is impossible to deny the allure of CVS brand gourmet banana mash. The slightly grimy delight is full of nutrients, useful not only to newborns, but also the finals-cramming college student,who needs to grow back a few brain cells before their physics exam.

 

An extra perk of the Gerber diet is the ease of consummation. One barely has to chew, yet unlike applesauce, baby food never gets old. Available flavors range from prunes, to mangos, to peaches (a personal favorite). Clean up is quick and easy. Unlike most crummy college snack-packs, baby food only requires a spoon, leaving your post-snack time free of tedious cleanup.

 

Baby food is remarkably easy to digest, making it a friend of upset and picky stomachs. Vegans and those who prefer to stay gluten-free will be happy to find that most baby food brands offer a wide variety of diet-conscious options. The diet is also greatly helpful for those who struggle with portion control, as the tiny containers limit late-night feasting.

 

For understandable reasons, some students are averse to reverting to their pre-toddler days, arguing that baby food simply doesn’t “taste as good” as your run-of-the-mill burger or steak. But while these claims do have a point, one can’t help but marvel at the incredible flavor variety available in the baby food department—squash appears to be a crowd favorite.

The diet is also greatly helpful for those who struggle with portion control, as the tiny containers limit late-night feasting.

Those interested in returning to the mashed foods of yesteryear, visit your local CVS, Walgreens or Target, and ask to see their baby food section.