Nash Gallery Features “Women and Money” Exhibit

xavier-wang-woman-and-money-01New exhibit explores gender inequality and economics through the work of female artists

The newest exhibit at the Nash Gallery on West Bank is titled “Women and Money.” The exhibit features work by female artists, all aiming to expose people to social themes that surround economic inequality between men and women.

 

xavier-wang-woman-and-money-04One of the first works that stands out in “Women and Money” is a piece by Karen Wilcox titled “Penitence.” White button-down shirts hang in an arc above a wash bin with a piece of cloth in it, worn from multiple washes and covered with smudged writing. Some of the barely distinguishable words read “dinner on the table,” “ironing,” and “childcare.” Stark but powerful, Wilcox’s work is one of many at the exhibit that can make gallery goers think about the history of the unpaid, domestic roles society set aside for women.

Walk into another section of the exhibit and a familiar face will greet you. This face is Donald Trump’s: orange as ever, but this time made of papier-mâché. Artist Priscilla Otani has embodied Trump in a piñata, already half-smashed. The “guts” spilling onto the floor are dollar bills,and on each one, “You’re fired!” is printed in a loud red.

Woman and Money

Photos by Xavier Wang

The exhibit has a variety of works, from multi-media installations to smaller framed images and sculptures. One of the framed works, a collage by Jennifer Weigel, has a lot to say about how women are often seen as objects rather than people. Pasted together are magazine clippings that create the image of a woman’s body, but in place of where a head would be is a cowboy boot. Discounts like “Starting at $17.99” and “Clearance! 50% off!” swirl around the body.

Another standout in the exhibit is a print by Tonja Torgerson. Imprinted on the paper, a woman stands with money dripping off of her. It falls to the floor, almost as if she was bleeding it. Around her, the words “Only the wealthy… Get to stay healthy” are written.

Wilcox’s work is one of many at the exhibit that can make gallery goers think about the history of the unpaid, domestic roles society set aside for women.

“Women and Money” is a must-see for anyone who wants to spend 45 minutes gazing at a collection of artwork curated to communicate the realities of gender and economic inequality in the world. The exhibit will run until Dec. 10 at the Katherine E. Nash Gallery.